Call for papers for three new series in Conflict and Health

1) NCDs among conflict-affected populations

Conflict and Health is pleased to announce a call for papers for a new thematic series on non-communicable diseases (NCDs) among conflict-affected populations. We seek papers addressing key questions such as:

  • What are the burdens and patterns of NCDs and their risk-factors?
  • How effective and feasible are prevention and treatment services for NCDs?
  • How can health services, systems and policies be more responsive to NCDs?
  • What are the methodological developments in researching and monitoring NCDs?
  • What are the key barriers to addressing NCDs and how can they best be overcome?

We welcome quantitative and qualitative research papers, reviews, short-reports, case-studies, methodology articles, commentaries, and debate articles.

This series will be edited by Bayard Roberts (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine), Kiran Jobunputra (MSF), Preeti Patel (King's College London) and Pablo Perel (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine).

2) Developing psychometrically-sound psychological measures for populations impacted by humanitarian crises

Conflict and Health is pleased to announce a call for papers on developing psychometrically-sound psychological measures for populations impacted by humanitarian crises (including longer-term humanitarian crises and forced migration settings). 

There has been a growing realization among mental health and psychosocial professionals that the validity of the measurements used in humanitarian crises should be demonstrated rather than assumed. This thematic series aims to showcase state-of-the-art psychometric methodologies that have been used in humanitarian crises. We seek papers addressing key questions in humanitarian crises such as:

  • When is it appropriate to adapt an existing measure or create a new measure?
  • What are the best psychometric approaches to measurement development and adaptation?
  • How can agencies create psychometrically sound measures in a cost-effective manner?
  • What psychosocial variables require attention to when adapting or developing a measure?
  • What are the central constructs of interest in humanitarian crises?

We welcome quantitative and qualitative research papers in particular; but also reviews, short-reports, case-studies, methodology articles, commentaries, and debate articles. We are particularly interested in attracting submissions authored by researchers from the Global South, and publication costs for such authors will be waived in accordance with the policies of Conflict and Health.

This series will be edited by Andrew Rasmussen (Fordham University), Nuwan Jayawickreme (Manhattan College) and Bayard Roberts (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine).


3) Ethics of health research conducted in conflict and other humanitarian settings

Conflict and Health is pleased to announce a call for papers on ethics of health research conducted in conflict and other humanitarian settings. The issue of ethical challenges encountered when conducting health research in conflict and other humanitarian settings is receiving increased attention. Many reasons may lie behind this, including increased numbers of conflicts around the world, increased research with populations affected by conflicts and other humanitarian crises, increased awareness about situations of exploitation, and increased attention by funders and regulatory bodies in related research areas. However, confusion often exists about what qualifies as research that requires ethical oversight in these settings, compounded by a lack of adequate ethics oversight capacity in many of the countries affected by conflict and other humanitarian crises. In addition, more attention is required around issues such as publishing operational data, emergency-related research requiring rapid ethics review including the role of waivers, usage of population level data without prior ethics review or participant consent and piloting of innovative practice and equipment without prior ethical inquiry and scrutiny. 

This thematic issue aims to promote the discussion around ethics of health research in conflict and other humanitarian settings, with a special focus on areas (but not limited to) such as:

  • What are the ethical challenges raised by health research conducted in conflict settings?
  • What types of projects or activities require ethics review (and of what type) in these settings?
  • What are the benefits, challenges, inefficiencies, etc. of ethics review processes?
  • What are the ethical issues with cross-cultural research, issues of vulnerability, conflicts of interest, exploitation, etc.?
  • What are the benefits and risks of bringing community voices into research?
  • What should happen after the research is over? What are the post-research ethical issues?
  • What are the ethical issues around publishing operational data without prior ethics review (e.g. sexual violence, mental health, child health, etc.)?
  • What are the ethical issues around emergency-related research and rapid ethics review, including role of waivers?
  • What are the ethical issues around the use of population-level evaluation data without prior ethics review or participant consent for research use?
  • What are the ethical issues around piloting and evaluating innovative practice and equipment not subjected to prior ethical enquiry and scrutiny?
  • Other relevant issues

We welcome quantitative and qualitative research papers, reviews, short reports, case studies, methodology articles, commentaries, and debate articles. We are particularly interested in submissions from researchers or practitioners working in actual conflict or other humanitarian settings. This is an open thematic series with no deadline set yet.

This series will be edited by Chesmal Siriwardhana (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine), Dónal O’Mathúna (Dublin City University) and Bayard Roberts (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine). 

Please direct any inquiries regarding these series to editorial@conflictandhealth.com.

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